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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 22, 2017 3:00pm-4:00pm BST

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does so, i'm clear that britain's it does so, i'm clear that britain's future is bright. ourfundamentals are strong. a legal system respected around the world, a keen openness to foreign investment, and enthusiasm foreign investment, and enthusiasm for innovation, and ease of doing business. some of the best universities and research you can find anywhere, and exceptional national talent for creativity and an indomitable spirit. it is our fundamental strengths that determine a country's success. that is why britain's economy will always be strong. there are other reasons why our future should give us confidence. we will always be a champion of economic openness. we will always be a country whose pitch to the world is high standards at home. when we differ from the to the world is high standards at home. when we differfrom the eu, it won't be to obtain an unfair advantage, but because we want rules that are right for britain's particular situation. the best way for us to both to succeed is to full
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fulfil the potential of the the partnership. if this was to prove insufficient to reach agreement it would be a failure in the eyes of history and a damaging blow to the future of our continent. i believe the difference between where we would be if we fail, and if we achieve a new partnership that its so achieve a new partnership that its so great it is beholden us to demonstrate the flexibility and leadership needed. yes, the negotiations will be difficult. but if we approach them in the right way, respectful of the challenges for both sides, and pragmatic about resolving them, we can find a way forward that makes a success of this forward that makes a success of this for all our peoples. i recognise that this not something that you,
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oui’ that this not something that you, our european partners, wanted to do. it isa our european partners, wanted to do. it is a distraction from what you wa nt to it is a distraction from what you want to get on with. but we have to get this right. and we both want to get this right. and we both want to get this right. and we both want to get this done as swiftly as possible. so it is up to leaders to set the tone. and the tone i want to set the tone. and the tone i want to set is one of partnership and friendship. a tone of trust, the corner stone of any relationship. for if we get the spirit of this negotiation right, if we get the spirit of this partnership right, then at the end of this process, we will find that we are able to resolve the issues where we disagree respectfully and quickly. and if we can do that, then when this chapter of our european history is written, it will be remembered not for the differences that we faced, but for the vision we showed. not for the challenges we endured but for the creativity we used toover come them.
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not for a relationship that ended, but a new partnership that pe afghanistan. —— began. a partnership of ambition for a shared future. the uk and the eu side by side delivering prosperity and opportunity for all our people. this is the future within our grasp. so together, let us seize it. thank you. applause. applause. there is an opportunities for some questions. i will go first toi for some questions. i will go first
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to i think, is the reporter here. so far 600,000 italians now live and work in the uk. you said you want them to remain. how, what is going to change for them. i guess something is going to change? well, we set out for those citizens, eu citizens currently living in the uk, who have made it home, including the 600,000 italians, we want them to be able to stay and have the same rights as they have at the moment. and we have negotiated, nexting this with the eu as the british prime minister, i want uk nationals living in italy and elsewhere to maintain their rights too. we are very close to ensuring that we have that agreement and i have set out today what i hope is a reassurance that those italian citizens living in the united kingdom as we move ahead will
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know it is our legal system that will guarantee those rights into the future. i think that is what people wa nt to future. i think that is what people want to know. from my point of view, i value the contribution that italian citizens have made in the united kingdom and i have a few italian citizens living in my own constituency and playing a very real pa rt constituency and playing a very real part in our social and economic life there. i want to ensure those italian citizens in the uk know we wa nt italian citizens in the uk know we want you to stay and we value your contribution and i'm guaranteeing your rights for the future. thank you. laura. thank you. what do you say to voters at home who chose to leave who might be angry to hear that the immigration rules will be roughly the same, markets will be the same for another few year, the european courts will still have a role for another five years. potentially until 202 #1shgs five
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years after the referendum, aren't theyjustified in being a bit cross about that and in your view is no deal still better than a bad deal? on the last point, we continue to believe that. but the important thing is what i have done today is set out an entire speech which is about what a great deal we can have of the future of the future partnership between the uk and the eu if we approach it with ambition and creativity. we can achieve a deal that i believe is in the best interests of people across the 27 states in the remaining eu. on the issue of immigration that you have set out, people voted to leave the eu and at the end of march 2019, we will leave, but people also voted to ensure that that process could be smooth so, that people had confidence in their future and
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businesses had confidence and in their future too. that is what i have set out today. an implementation period to provide for that smooth and orderly withdrawal. there will be a difference during that period. we will be asking eu citizens who come to the uk, they can do so, but we will be asking them to register. that is an important building block towards the full set of immigration rules that will be in when the new partnership is in place and when we take full control of our borders. so that is an important stage in us taking control of our borders. prime minister on the the transition phase, you said we could still be under eu laws, do you rule out being a memberof european under eu laws, do you rule out being a member of european economic member during that period and on the final status deal, you outlined a spectrum between canada and norway, it seemed
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you leaning closer to norway and perhaps the chancellor than canada and the foreign secretary. is that a correct reading of the situation? laughter. no this is one of the things i would say to you, that i suggest that you start thinking not just about noer norway and canada, but the fact that the uk is in a different relationship with the eu from either of those countries. that gives us an opportunity to create a partnership that is completely different. what we are talking about during the implementation period is a practical, a period of time for the practical changes that are necessary to put in place the full new partnership and of course you can't do those practical changes until you know what the partnership is and the negotiations of course we will leave at end of march 2019 and negotiations will continue quite close to that time. but let's think
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creatively and be ambitious, because isaid, we creatively and be ambitious, because i said, we start from an unprecedented position in terms of oui’ unprecedented position in terms of our current relationship with the eu. that enables us to build a different sort of partnership. james? different sort of partnership. james? your strategy since lancaster house seems to have been to lay out positions and then concede to what europe will agree to. it has happened on the sequences of talks and happened today on money and on their requirements for a transition. can you point to a single concession from the eu that your strategy has woi'i from the eu that your strategy has won for you? can i say during the negotiations there are a number of issues where we have seat a position pape per and we now —— paper and we 110w pape per and we now —— paper and we now have agreement on a variety of esh use. issues. i channelling the
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picture you have set out. what —— i challenge the picture you have set out. we have set out our negotiating principles, and i set them out in lancaster house and the negotiating guidelines that came back from eu to a very great extent mirrored the issues we had raised as key issues to look at during this relationship. this is negotiation there will be sides put out their positions, discuss the positions and come to an agreement. what i'm doing today is saying here is an opportunity for both of us, the uk and the eu to come to agree to a new partnership, a partnership that hasn't been in place with anybody else in the past, because of reasons i have set out, but can be one that will really show a great future for the eu and the uk
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for the future of people notjust in the uk but in the eu as well. did i see jason here? what would you say to people who voted to leave and who think we should have left already and we should turn off the direct debit and we shouldn't, we should stop free movement and tell the europeanjudges to stop free movement and tell the european judges to get lost? they have got a right to feel a bit betrayed today haven't they? no, what the government is doing is ensuring that we deliver on what the people who voted to leave wanted, which is for us leaving the eu. if we are going to ensure that we do that in a way that has little damage and disruption to our economy and people's lives, we need to do that ina people's lives, we need to do that in a smooth and orderly way. but what we are clear about is that the implementation period will have, will be time limited and that we
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will be time limited and that we will leave the eu in march 2019. that is what the process of withdrawal has asked for and that is what is going to happen. tom. thank you, on your section on security, you, on your section on security, you said that the uk's committed to securing europe's security. that therefore means you will co—operate with military and intelligence with or without a deal and so therefore what do you say to people who may accuse you of having thrown away britain's best cards? the issue around security and our co—operation on criminal matters is important to all of us. we do face significant challenges, particularly in relation to the security issues, but we have seen over time and obviously i saw this particularly when i was home secretary, how that co—operation
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with our european partners is good for us and good for them. i think what members of the public would say to us, is we want you as the government to ensure that we can continue a partnership, a co—operation that is helping in terms of keeping us safe in the uk and across europe. i think that is what people want us to do. a couple more. george. thank you, george parker from the financial times, can i ask you two questions, during the immremation phase, would — implementation phase would britain be subject to new laws passed by brussels, while we don't have a say in making the laws. you were setting out about idea of us being close to the single market, would britain be prepared to pay for access to that single market? something some of
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your backbenchers say is not right? asi your backbenchers say is not right? as i said, during the implementation period, because it is in the interests of individuals and businesses to have a period of time when they can make the adjustment, make the changes necessary, be it in it or whatever, but know the basis on whey they're going to be operating and that it would be operating and that it would be operating on the current rules and framework. now, of course the details of that would have to be pa rt details of that would have to be part of negotiation, what i have set out is a principle in relation to that. and i think that is important. it is important in the interests. it not just of it is important in the interests. it notjust of businesses, but of individuals as well. as you will know, the eu withdrawal bill that we are putting through parliament brings the eu law into uk law to ensure that we have that smooth and orderly process of withdrawal and people know at the points at which we leave we still know the basis on
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which they're able to operate. i will take a final question. is a representative of the deutsche press here. what do you now expect from brussels and berlin? after this speech? what i would hope is people in brussels, berlin and across the eu would say this is the united kingdom setting out the opportunities for us to work together to negotiate what will be a strong partnership, i have used the term deep and special partnership what will ensure the future prosperity of countries in the eu and the united kingdom. and i hope that people will feel that and will respond to it in a tone and a way of partnership and friendship, because thatis partnership and friendship, because that is what the uk is offering. it is important not just for that is what the uk is offering. it is important notjust for the uk, but for the whole eu. the remaining
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27 will be considering what their future is in the eu. we want the eu to continue to be strong. it is in oui’ to continue to be strong. it is in our interest for it to be successful. what i have set out is a way to go on together. a sovereign united kingdom, buta way to go on together. a sovereign united kingdom, but a strong and successful eu working too. thank you. applause. so there is the prime minister, theresa may, setting out her vision of how britain will leave the european union. some interesting details. she said there will be a two—year, or she hopes for a two—year, or she hopes for a two—year transition period or an implementation period. she seemed to say the uk is not in a position to smoothly exit in march 2019 without
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one. but she said we will honour the financial commitments. so the figures that have been bandied around she poo poo, but she said no country will pay nor or receive less than they expected in the current be budget round. there will be a new treaty to underpin co—operation on security and criminal justice. treaty to underpin co—operation on security and criminaljustice. she said you need to start thinking about a very different end destination. we want to be a global free trading nation, able to chart oui’ free trading nation, able to chart our own way. so not a norwegian model, nor the canadian model bgs which she said would reaccess. —— would restrict access. and uk courts taking into consideration european court rulings on eu citizens. some
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interesting detail. here is norman smith. a bit of detail on transition and the payments and in general terms more of her saying look you need to treat us as an equal partner. a lot of brexiteers would applaud herfor that. partner. a lot of brexiteers would applaud her for that.|j partner. a lot of brexiteers would applaud her for that. i thought the balance was on the mood music, as if she had take an leaf from boris johnson, trying to strike a more optimistic note, saying britain will a lwa ys optimistic note, saying britain will always be strong and we can do this. saying to eu leader, you do have a responsibility, it is a time for leadership and interesting she talked about leaders, not the european council, but leaders, it is in your self—interest to strike a deal with us as we expected pointing back to our shared heritage about we will continue to defend and abide by security arrangements with the eu. all fine. big picture. passion nate.
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ate. less on the nitty—gritty, i didn't sense we got much further forward that we already knew. we got the two year ran sigs and the promise —— transition and the promise —— transition and the promise to meet our budgetary commitments during this period, although no figure. we did get that on the money side. on eu nationals, i think there will be a lot of questions about how far theresa may has gone. that was the key sticking points. she said i'm offering real guarantees, but on who will guarantees, but on who will guarantee that it is british courts, but they will have to take account of rulings by the european court of justice. there is a trust issue there. michele barnier said we want there. michele barnier said we want the european court to oversee their rights. that is again going to be pa rt rights. that is again going to be part of negotiation. but let me be
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devil's advocate. we are still in the first phase, she has to answer questions on severance and payment and the rest it for tomorrow? yes, but time is cranking in very hard. the three areas where i think she did need to be specific was money. yes, we got some detail and that may unglue some of deadlock. on eu nationals and mr barnier yesterday was flagging up this is an absolutely critical issue. it has to be resolved before we can move to the next stage of talks. i didn't hear and you know it is only a first cast, i didn't hear that substantive detail to change the dynamic on the eu nationals. we have will have to hear from legal experts. eu nationals. we have will have to
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hear from legal expertslj eu nationals. we have will have to hear from legal experts. i have clive coleman is saying if we should ta ke clive coleman is saying if we should take into account ecj rulings, that is how the courts work at presents. that has led to debate as to what that actually means. that suggests that actually means. that suggests thatis that actually means. that suggests that is not a game—changer proposal. also i thought on the end game, where are we going, to boil it down that, seemed to be the borisjohnson let's have our cake and eat it scenario and we want as good trading relationships as we have, but we don't want the bills and obligations that go with it. we want a new unique economic arrangement. the brexiteer would say why not. we are the fifth biggest trading economy and we have relations with these country and why can't we have cake and eat it? because bluntly it if we get a deal that is so stonkingly good, other eu countries will think, wait a moment, we will have a bit of
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that too. the political imperative in the eu is to keep the eu together. the idea they will cut us a deal that is better give us access to the single market, dispenses with obligations, that is a big reach. but that seemed to be what mrs may was saying, let's be creative. the words are fine, but what is in it for the eu in her view is economically it is in your interest to trade with us. the counter point is political my is a huge imperative not to bend over to give britain a great deal. so is no deal still better than a bad deal. she said yes. but you look around in the uk there is no preparation for the no deal. i thought that was significant. that is where we are heading unless these talks move
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ahead, because if there is no progress, there is less time, we are moving to the buffers of probably next autumn and if we haven't got it sorted, we are leaving without a deal. i thought it was interesting. mrs may is not resiling from that. she is saying no deal, better than a bad deal. that sort of iron in our negotiating position remains. so put it together, what has she moved on from lancaster house? a bit on money. yes. perhaps on eu nationals. although from clive is saying i don't think so. on final destinations we still want this bespoke arrangement. that seems to bespoke arrangement. that seems to be what we got was a bit more welly, a little bit on money, but not a significant movement or change from lancaster house that. raises the question, is there enough here for the eu leader to say, ok, you have done enough, we are going to move
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on? we will find out on monday, the fourth round of talks start and there will be a european council meeting. like marketing the homework, they will decide whether there has been enough progress. some on transition, a double lock. a period of implementation up to two—yea rs. period of implementation up to two—years. but strictly time—limited. that is a nod to the likes of boris johnson. the fear of the brexiteer s is that we stick with what we have got and we carry on and we never really leave. the eu and the cbi have floated that that we carry on. she has ruled that out. saying no, two years is it. she referred to it as a perpetual
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arrangement: the other thing was there was a line where she appealed to leaders to show leadership. and that i think is her hope that for all the legalistic sort of difficulties, in this process and the insistence of mr barnier of sticking to their mandate and legalities, her hope is and the hope of david davis is the big countries — france, germany — at the end of day will look at their own economies and decide, never mind all this nitty—gritty del detail, we need a deal. that is why we heard the rhetoric about them showing leadership. it is in your interests to do leadership. it is in your interests todoa leadership. it is in your interests to do a deal. it is a very big ask. there is a desire among eu leader not to jeopardise the future of the eu. we will talk to you more.
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theresa may speaking for about a0 minutes here in florence. we will get some reaction from around the europe and we will bring you that as well let's get more reaction from labour's shadow brexit minister, minister, jenny chapman, who is in our studio in middlesbrough. what did you make of the speech?” don't shi she is very good at this. we are 18 months in. the speech had a hell of a build we are 18 months in. the speech had a hell ofa build up and it was weak, empty and just listening to norman smith clearly leaves so many questions understand answered and i think many people will be scratching their heads and wondering what on earth the fuss has been about with this speech. because really beyond committing to transition, which frankly everybody knew was
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inevitable, there wasn't much to it. there is not on the end destination, although she is urging people to think big, as i said, small steps and we are in the first phase and she has to answer those three critical questions, what is going to happen to eu citizens, we had a bit on that. what will lap with money and what will happen with ireland and what will happen with ireland and she did give some detail on those issues. she didn't actually. the question of eu nationals, i don't think she said anything new or give any comfort to eu nationals or to british nationals living in the, on the continent. on the the money she did give a hint, that is true. we will give her that. on northern ireland, you know, and i have some sympathy for here, she said we have agreed it difficult and important and that is a good reason to... no
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physical infrastructure at the border. but that is not new. everybody‘s been saying that. nobody wa nts a everybody‘s been saying that. nobody wants a hard border in northern ireland. nobody wants that. so to make a huge fuss about a speech to give us this bombshell, i feel very disappointed in her speech. when she says you said there was nothing there for eu citizens, she said we wa nt there for eu citizens, she said we want you to stay and we value you and thank you for your contribution to our national life. the guarantee i give you is real. that is worm words and that is lovely. —— warm words. we wanted a change in tone. but what does that mean? because the difficulty here with eu nationals and securing their rights is to
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decide upon which mechanism any disputes can be resolved or their rights can be enforced to say that uk courts are going to do this with reference to the ecj when many in her party would find that completely unacceptable and our prime minister is walking a tightrope here that is about the breadth of a hair and i just, i worry deeply that she is, she is trying to say the right thing and use the right words and set the right tone and for that, that is fine as far as it goes. but actually there is nothing there of substance to assure eu nationals. your party campaigned for brexit in the election or it seeped to support brexit, we are not sure. she said we are leaving the eu. would you give the same guarantee? what would be
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saying, we do accept the outcome of the referendum, we voted to trigger article 50. we are so along this process and so article 50. we are so along this process and so near article 50. we are so along this process and so near to completion of the end of the article 50 clock that is ticking, that to be standing in a european city pleading with a group of journalists to try and european city pleading with a group ofjournalists to try and see things her way and sending messages to leaders of nations in that way it is wea k leaders of nations in that way it is weak and we should be much further ahead. it's a simple question. would you support that or not? you have probably noticed the row we have had about it in our party, that you can't be a member of the single market as it currently exists because we have made a commitment that we'll have a new immigration
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system after we've left the eu and those two things, quite simply are... so not in the single market? so... yes. and not in the customs union? well, we want to have free trade and keep things flowing across oui’ trade and keep things flowing across our borders so that our manufacturers can trade really well as they do now, we want to keep those benefits of being in a customs union. now, the exact nature of that needs to be negotiated and those are the things the prime minister ought to be bending her head around and aplaying the brains of her departments to. those are the things that really, really matter and we are going to have to get on with those things very soon if we are to avoid a cliff edge. these things really matter to jobs and the economy in our country. good to get your thoughts, thank you very much.
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a tweet from boris johnson your thoughts, thank you very much. a tweet from borisjohnson — the prime minister's speech was positive, optimistic, dynamic. she was right to dispose of the norway option. onwards. that is boris johnson's optimistic view of the speech. we'll see if people share those sentiments in the coming hours. here is some weather with chris. not sure if you have sunshine or storm clouds. best of the sunshine across eastern england. a band of rain has been working into the west. look at the skies we have at the moment. in bedfordshire, a bit of fair weather cloud. overnight, patchy outbreaks pushing east across england and wales. a milder night for england and wales. temperatures 12-1a. reasonable weather. sunny spells for
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all. saturday the best of the two days. we start off cloudy with a few patches of rain. sunny spells will break out from the south. becoming windy across the south—western areas. temperatures doing well for scotland. hello, you are watching bbc news. the headlines: theresa may's been setting out the proposals for a two—year transition period after britain leaves the european union in march 2019. she's promised to honour budget commitments until 2020. we want the eu to continue to be strong, it is in our national interests for the eu to continue to be successful. what i've set out today is a way we can go forward together. an 18-year-old
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man's been charged with attempted murder following the attack at parsons green tube station last friday. police chiefs are facing very ha rd friday. police chiefs are facing very hard choices as| on gafi'zhyiz ‘ha
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—;§m7£ well, this just bring us up-to-date? well, this afternoon, 18—year—old ahmed hassan has appeared here at westminster magistrates court charged with attempted murder following the parsons green terror attack last friday morning. in court, he confirmed his name and address which is in sunbury in surrey. the 18—year—old was arrested in dover a day after the attack last friday morning. police this afternoon have confirmed that he's been charged with attempted murder relating to rail passengers on the district line tube train last friday morning. he's also been charged with maliciously using an explosive device to endanger life or to cause serious harm or injury. in court, we heard the explosive device was made with hundreds of grammes of tatb, a powerful explosive, and the prosecutor lee ingham said it was the crown's case that he intended to kill innocent people because of his warped political views. the
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18—year—old has been remanded in custody. he's due to appear at the old bailey on the 13th october. let's just bring you right up—to—date with what theresa may has been saying in florence. she's used her speech to propose a transitional deal with the european union of about two years after march 2019. the prime minister told her audience in italy that the uk would honour its commitments to the current eu budget and other eu members should not pay more or receive less because of brexit. the speech was aimed at breaking the deadlock in the brexit talks and theresa may also called for a new model forfuture talks and theresa may also called for a new model for future economic relations with the eu and said it wouldn't suit britain or the european union to join the eea, wouldn't suit britain or the european union tojoin the eea, the european union tojoin the eea, the european economic area, like norway and switzerland, she said shalled involve london giving up too much control. she ruled out emulating the relationship can that is negotiating
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with europe. mrs may said the uk was well placed to get a better deal. the uk is the eu's largest trading partner, one of the largest economies in the world and a market of considerable importance for many businesses and jobs across the continent. and the eu is our largest trading partner. so it is in all our interests to find a creative solution. and the eu has shown in the past that creative arrangements can be agreed in other areas. for example, it's developed a diverse array of arrangements with neighbouring countries outside the eu, both in economic relations and injustice and eu, both in economic relations and in justice and home affairs. further more, we share the same set of fundamental beliefs. a belief in free trade, rigorous and fair competition, strong consumer rights, and that trying to beat other country's industries by unfairly subsidising one's own is a serious mistake. so there is no need to
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impose tariffs where we have none know and i don't think anyone sensible is contemplating this. an excerpt of the prime minister's speech in florence. let's go back there now where the prime minister's been setting out that vision of a future relationship with the eu and rejoin my colleague christian frazer. thank you very much. welcome back to florence. lots of people here in the square, particularly the remainers, ex—pats from the city who have been here protesting today talking about what they've heard. some of it they like, some they don't. quite a lot of it they don't like. let us find out what those who campaigned for brexit think about it. i think nigel farage canjoin us think about it. i think nigel farage can join us from think about it. i think nigel farage canjoin us from millbank. good afternoon. good afternoon. she seemed to be intimating in this speech that the uk's not in a position to smoothly exit the eu on march 2019 without a transition deal? well, what she really said
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today was look, we are going to leave the grew but we'll do it in name only, it's my intention that trade and security arrangements shall continue as they are, science arrangeps shall continue as they are. in fact, arrangeps shall continue as they are. infact, she arrangeps shall continue as they are. in fact, she made it pretty clear that she doesn't want the leave at all and she wants the current status quo to simply be rebadged. as far as the transition period is concerned, well, let's be clear, we didn't vote for a transition period. all these arguments about cliff edges and the things goldman sachs tell us we should be thinking, that was settled in the referendum, we voted to leave and it's now going to be a minimum of five years before we leave the european union and i wouldn't be surprised if this woman's still in charge if we don't get to 2021 and be told we need two or three more yea rs. be told we need two or three more years. but she said in that speech, we will not be members of the single market, we will not be members of the customs union, we want to be a free trading nation. that's what you
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wa nt free trading nation. that's what you want isn't it? let's do it now then, immediately! the point about the negotiations is that the strongest ca rd negotiations is that the strongest card you have in any business negotiation in life is the fact the other side need to know that if you are not happy, you are going to walk away. today, she threw that position away. today, she threw that position away. her strongest negotiating hand disappeared today. there is nothing that she said today that will make the european union suddenly say yes, 0k, the european union suddenly say yes, ok, we'll give you what you want and ifear ok, we'll give you what you want and i fear that this transition arrangement that she's opted for where effectively we stay full members for another two years, i fear that could go on for a long time. i know the line, we are the fifth biggest economy in the world, we can do this on our own, and she was asked today after this speech where whether the no—deal scenario was feasible and whether it was better than a bad deal and she said yes, i still hold to that position. what alarms a lot of people in the uk and
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it alarms the remainers, is that there's no preparation for the new deal, we don't see any work at customs ports or immigration or trade representatives in china or in india. no. all the preparations you would expect? the one really important thing is that the people today that will be really upset will be countries all over the world who saw brexit as a fantastic opportunity to get closer to the united kingdom from america to australia to india, queues of countriesjoining australia to india, queues of countries joining up that represent the 85% of the world economy that is outside the european union and the message from florence today is, britain is not open for business, we will not be doing deals with any of you for many years to come. and that to me is the saddest part of this speech. is that really true, because i'm sure there is a lot of discussion going on in the background, and once we move into this transition period it wouldn't make any sense at all would it to belong to the cowes toms
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union and to not be able to negotiate, because by the end of it we'd still be at the cliff edge? we are in september 2017. what has been signalled today is we will not be signing any trade deals until 2022, and that is at the most optimistic. we are wasting years and years of a golden opportunity by trying to pursue something with the european union that at the moment they look very reluctant to do. what about the european citizens in the uk, who're very unnerved by this. she said we value your contrick wruetion to the uk way of life and we'll uphold your right, but under uk law, uk courts observing law from the european courts, what do you make of that —— contribution? it's a half way fudge. she's trying not to upset anybody, saying the courts will take into account what the jean court of justice says. remember we voted to ta ke justice says. remember we voted to take back control of our laws, borders and courts and she's
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prepared to compromise absolutely all of those. come on, free movement of people, one of the biggest issues in the referendum. again it will be at least five years since we voted brexit before we get back any control we can come into this country from the european union. there'll be a lot of people listening tojenny there'll be a lot of people listening to jenny chapman there'll be a lot of people listening tojenny chapman who we have had on and you saying gosh this is an impossible choice trying to find a way through the middle of the argument, through the debate and that debate is reflected in the cabinet is impossible for anybody isn't it? we had the debate, it was called the referendum. we reach add conclusion. we now have a clear 70% of our population that simply want the government to get on with it and what we have done today is we kicked it into the long grass for at least another two years. it's a good day for westminster, it's a good day for the political class, it's a good day for goldman sachs, but it's too fingers up to 17.a million people
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who voted for brexit. nigel farage, thank you for being with us this afternoon. the first time that she's talked of a transition period or implementation period as she calls it, it will be up to two years, there'll be a double lock, so it won't be open—ended. it will be defined. it won't be any more than two years. that will be a relief to some in the business community. there are plenty of companies sitting on money, they don't know how to plan, so what do they make of it. the business community's robert hall is in leeds for us. hello. hello. we are in the centre of leeds financial district at the offices of redmayne bentley, investment managers, stockbrokers and we have been watching things closely. i don't know whether this speech was an appointment to view right around the uk but it certainly was here. straight to david, you are the chief executive here, you are an investment manager, the first
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question, nigel farage saying get on and do it now so businesses know where they stand. lit‘s deal with that first? business, most of it, wants to avoid a cliff edge and therefore confirmation about the transitional period is very welcome, not a surprise but it's positive news. what about you ? news. what about you? businesses need time to plan and we've got a transition period where they can put strategies together and plan what they're going together and plan what they're going to do through that period, that is a positive. before this happened, before she stood up to speak this afternoon, theresa may, what were business saying to you, what were people looking for? people were looking for certainty and to know how long, if a transitional period was going to be brought in, how long it was going to be and what sort of framework that would entail and what they've got today is to know yes, we have got a transitional period, a deadlock which means there's a hard end to that peer wroted so it's not going to be open—ended.
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david, there was talk of aspiration, there was certainly a conciliatory tone. did you see the speech as taking us any further forward than we we re taking us any further forward than we were a couple of hours ago? the markets don't seem to have reacted? i think it's confirmation of pretty much everything we expected her to say. she's tried to put a warm glow around the negotiations to enable them to make progress and she's probably achieved that. but there's nothing dramatic there for markets or anybody else to get terribly excited about. is that what is needed, something a little bit more to sit up. if so, what is it in your view? it's a fine balance, she can't doa view? it's a fine balance, she can't do a lot, all the progress will be made in the negotiations, so she needs to set the right tone for that and enable them to make progress. she can't do much more than that at this stage so it's unrealistic to expect her to. you were looking with
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your investment hat on at the markets while she was speaking. there was parallel movement? that is right. the currency markets, the pound strengthened against the euro and the dollar and that sort of flattened equity markets. while she was talking, the pound weakened slightly. there was a constant weakening throughout her speech which lasted a5 minutes. that conversely sent the equity market thriving steadily. as we have seen, we have read and heard that as it retreats, because the ftse 100 we have read and heard that as it retreats, because the ftse100 is made up of international businesses, the earnings outside the uk are that bit more when they're translated into pound sterling. funnily enough, after speech and questions and a nswe rs after speech and questions and answers took place, sterling started to ta ke answers took place, sterling started to take back some of the losses and against the dollar, it was flat on
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the day. one last question to both of you. when you speak to your clients, and christian in italy was talking about the inability to plan, what do your clients say they need? clients want certainty, they need certainty. what would be better for them certainty, they need certainty. what would be betterfor them is to know this transition period is in place so they can make plans to go through that but not only that, they can then look through at the other side and try to plan for how their businesses will operate post—exit. for the negotiations, the transition period is important, but it's most important really for theresa may to get through the talks about transition to start talking about long—term. i think today's speech helps a little bit in setting the tone for that progress in the negotiations, but the real progress will be made when we start talking about a long—term future. will be made when we start talking about a long-term future. thank you both very much. a lot to digest. i suspect we are going to be hearing a lot more on that discussion in the
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coming hours. back to you. interesting to hear about the sterling of movement. just looking at the twitter feeds of michel barnier and donald tusk, nothing yet but we'll bring you the reaction from europe as we get it. professor alan winters is the director of the uk trade observatory at the university of sussex, he joins us now. good afternoon to you. hello. one of the trading investment managers we were just listening to was saying she probably went as far as she could at the moment because it's not really in her power to go further than that, it is after all a negotiation? that is exactly right but it's a negotiation in the cabinet as well as a negotiation with europe so i guess she's walked through a sort of two—dimensional mine field and we'll see how that pans out in the future. michel barnier beat her to it. he was here yesterday in rome speaking to members of the italian senate. he
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has a completely different view to the options she has in front of her. he said you can't have the bespoke deal, it's either the norwegian model or the free trading sort of arrangement that canada now has. is that pretty much it? no, i don't think so. i think that we can negotiate somewhere in—between. we have got lots more similarities with europe than the canadians have so it ought to be easier to arrange more detailed deals across more sectors. the norwegian model, it'sjust conceivable we could start with the norwegian model and chip away at some of the freedoms that the eea, the european economic area commits. on the whole we can do better than canada. did she weaken — she seemed to
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intimate it was impossible to leave the european union within two years, doesn't that really undermine the british position? no, because the british position? no, because the british position? no, because the british position could just fall out and not suffer dreadful consequences, that is a complete fa ntasy. consequences, that is a complete fantasy. no, no, she's recognised reality i think and that's all for the good. what she has done, however, is set out her conditions for a transitional period as if it is in her power and in fact she has to negotiate the transition deal, as well as the long running deal. let's cross to owen paterson in our shrewsbury studio who campaigned for brexit. good afternoon to you? good afternoon. the opening lines of this speech were, we want to be a global free
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trading nation able to chart our own way. music to your ears i would have thought? absolutely spot on. i thought? absolutely spot on. i thought it was a very good start. that's what we'd all like. we'd like to have the very best trading terms with every nation on the planet. so she set out the right start, which is that we are going to leave the ecj, the customs union, which will give us the right to do the deals around the world, she confirmed all the programmes, which was very good. what worries me, my caveat will be the transitional phase. as long as this transition phase goes on, although she made it clear it should be as short as possible, that fallows european council recommendations, it should be clear and short and going to a specific destination, as long as we still have that period, we are still bound in by european rules and can't get cracking and open up markets around the world. the future is simplified
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by sirjames dyson announcing the amazing results in his business saying he'd like to leave as rapidly as possible. as long as we are in the transition, we can't take on the real advantages of leaving. my feeling was this was a generous speech, the tone was welcoming, but if the wean europeans don't get on and negotiate seriously on the basis of trying to set up reciprocal free trade because that's where she was going, she says very clearly we have conformity of standards and regulation, it really should be an easy trade deal to do, it is massively in the european union interest to do it because they have a huge surplus, the germans sold us 950,000 cars last year, you know, they have a huge strategic and selfish interest in doing a trade deal and we want reciprocal free tread to carry on in a free way. we
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should make it clear that no deal is better than a bad deal and start making preparations for that outcome if the trade is unfair for us. we trade on wto terms, the united states has accelerated its trades into the single market 50% from outside without paying a penny ransom. we from within have only increased our sales by 25%. so being outside... so what you are saying... it gives the chance to the dysons of this world to get on and expand their businesses as the rest of the world grows fast. 90% of world growth will come from outside the eu. but what you are saying is that your party has been negligent. if no deal is still on the table, surely we need to be very urgently
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preparing at the borders, preparing for a new immigration system, we need to have trade representatives in countries, we don't have any of that at the moment, so the preparations just aren't there? i think she made it very clear that the negotiations have progressed but not moved on to the absolute key element which is the final destination. she made it very clear, i thought, that what that should be, which should be an arrangement, improving on other treaties such as you mentioned, canada, but we want simple, rerip rickal free you mentioned, canada, but we want simple, rerip rickalfree trade respecting each other‘s standards and regulations on a free tariff basis. if they are not going to be serious about that, we have to wake them up to the fact that we are not frightened of walking away so that we can get on. it's the dysons we should be looking at, they are the companies that are going to be employing people in the future and creating wealth and enormous numbers ofjobs. creating wealth and enormous numbers of jobs. that's the creating wealth and enormous numbers ofjobs. that's the future. creating wealth and enormous numbers
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of jobs. that's the future. thank you very much. i'm picking up a bit of satisfaction on both sides. the ha rd of satisfaction on both sides. the hard brexiteers not entirely satisfied with what they've heard and certainly those on the remaining side saying, what we have heard is what we have heard before, there's not much detail in it. plenty more reaction from here and the european side as well, but we'll pause for a second for the weather. we'll we' ll start we'll start off with a look at what hurricane maria's been up to. so far, reports of over 30 fatalities, the majority of these have been in puerto rico and dominica. at the moment, the hurricane isjust to the north—east of the turks and chaos. there is the risk of further damage. from there, maria will spin out harmlessly out into the atlantic, so that should be the last
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we'll hear of maria. it will die away in the coming days. in the uk, we are seeing a familiar pattern with weather. there is a band of heavy rain working across northern ireland into western areas of scotla nd ireland into western areas of scotland but weakening as it moves that bit further east. you can see the rain's been becoming increasingly light and patchy. that will continue to be the case overnight. the cloud for england and wales, some of that will be low. patches of light rain and drizzle. a cold one for rural parts of scotland, with temperatures into low single figures, otherwise mild underneath that strip. the weekend weather as a whole, we'll all get to enjoy some spells of sunshine and rennesable temperatures. there'll be some rain in the west, particularly on sunday. sunday will be the best day of the weekend. the cloud thick
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enough for patches of rain in the porning. much of that will be over the hills and will tend to ease throughout the day. it will be a gusty day for the north—west. winds coming from a mild direction, so 17 for glasgow and belfast, 19 or 20 for glasgow and belfast, 19 or 20 for london and the south—east. we'll see some rain saturday night. that again moves into northern ireland. a weakening weather front pushing it way once again towards western scotland, western parts of england and for wales on sunday. the rain will be fairly light in places and patchy. to the east of this, there should be a fair bit of sunshine around on sunday, and if anything, it's going to be warmer. temperatures could reach 23 in the south. we are going to see some change in the weather in the next few days. probably tomorrow is the better of the two days of the weekend for most, but most having dry weather with sunny spells developing, particularly during the afternoon. that is
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this is bbc news. i'm christian fraser live in florence where the prime minister has given her most important speech on brexit to date. the prime minister reaffirmed her desire to protect the rights of eu citizens — she proposed a ‘bold new strategic agreement‘ on security cooperation and confirmed the prospect of an implementation period after march 2019. people will continue to be able to come and live and work in the uk. but there will be a registration system, an essential preparation for the new regime. as of today, these considerations point to an implementation period of around two yea rs. mrshe said a
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